The Nomad LT link installed on a 2019 Nomad 4.

The Nomad LT link was specifically designed to offer a more progressive leverage curve, increase travel, and lengthen chainstays all while maintaining stock pedaling characteristics. By making the suspension more progressive it’s possible to tune for increased small bump sensitivity while retaining the same bottom out resistance, increase bottom out resistance while retaining the same small bump, or a bit of both. Coupled with increased travel it really turns the Nomad 4 into the ultimate enduro/freeride/dh quiver killer. The increased progression also provides much needed bottom out resistance for coil shocks and aggressive riding.

Whether your goal is to make your everyday ride burlier or build the perfect park bike, the Nomad LT link offers a substantial performance increase. The additional travel with the longer shock is well managed. It provides supple small bump sensitivity off the top and has enough mid-travel support to feel poppy off jumps and solid through turns.

Over forking a bike to make it descend better can lead to suspension that feels out of balance. As the suspension compresses it reaches a point where the rear is no longer compressing and the front is. This can moves your weight forwards and steepens the head angle. The Nomad LT link balances the rear suspension with a longer travel fork well. Running the 190 mm setup the head angle slackens at the bottom of travel for improved stability when you need it most.


  • 190 mm of travel with 230 mm x 65 mm shock
  • 177 mm of travel with stock 230 mm x 60 mm shock
  • +6 mm chainstay length
  • Sealed Enduro MAX bearings
  • 8 mm x 30 mm eyelet spacing
  • 6061-T6 Aluminum
  • Colors: raw, black, blue (long lead time)

Set Up FAQs

This depends on what you’re mainly riding, but both work really well. For trails with lots of rock and roots we recommend the coil set up as it will smooth these out really well and for trails with lots of big hits the air will always feel more bottomless. Even with volume spacers the air shock does not feel harsh at the end of travel.

Using the spring rate listed below will provide more bottom out resistance than the stock link, but if you want even more go up 50 lbs in spring rate. This will leave the small bump sensitivity feeling similar to the stock link but the travel will feel bottomless.

The recommended spring rate listed below will also provide more small bump sensitivity than the stock link, but if you would like more go down 25 lbs in spring rate. We don’t recommend much lower than this because it will begin to make the bike sit lower in its travel than it should for pedaling, If you are shuttling or riding lifts feel free to go lower though.

Longer chainstays will make the bike more stable at speed especially through rough terrain. It’s also harder to wheelie out while climbing since the axle is further behind you. The stock Nomad has the same CS length as the Bronson, which doesn’t make sense considering how much more aggressive it’s supposed to be. The 6 mm of added length isn’t too much to the point where the bike begins to feel sluggish, but it gives it that little extra edge it should have had.

No you should not. Given normal tire size and seat height choices there will not be clearance issues. We stick with Santa Cruz’s recommended maximum tire sizes, though.

There is not a grease port on this link. After spending extensive time on the Nomad we have found that by the time the bearings need greasing they also usually need to be replaced. As a result, the grease port not is particularly useful. We chose to go with sealed Enduro MAX bearings and forgo the grease port because the bearings will last longer in harsh conditions. The bearings are the same size so you can still use the Santa Cruz lifetime bearing replacements, but they just won’t be sealed.

Yes it still works quite well and is a noticeable improvement over the stock link. I’ve spent a decent amount of time riding it with the stock Super Deluxe and rode it really well.


Recommended Spring Rates

Rider WieghtSrping RatePreload
120 lbs (54.4 kg)400 lbs1 turn
140 lbs (63.5 kg)450 lbs 1 turn
160 lbs (72.6 kg)500 lbs 1 turn
180 lbs (81.8 kg)575 lbs 1 turn
200 lbs (90.7 kg)650 lbs 1 turn
220 lbs (99.8 kg)700 lbs 1 turn

*All spring rates are calculated assuming 10 lbs of riding gear and a standard 64% rear weight bias. These are a fair bit different from the stock recommended rates because those are actually too low.